Separation of cannabinoids for clinical use

PrepChrom C-700: Isolation of cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from other cannabinoids extracted from cannabis

PrepChrom WordPressThe separation of cannabinoids is an important process which is necessary for clinical studies. The aim of these studies is to investigate the effect of the isolated cannabinoids on patients suffering from chronic illnesses and side effects caused by chemotherapy. The relaxation of laws concerning medical use of cannabis all around the world, especially the United States, has increased the interest in determining the effect of cannabinoids on the human body. Clinical studies require large amount of highly pure separated cannabnnoids. This can easily be achieved with the PrepChrom C-700.

Introduction

Cannabis is an extremely versatile plant and has been used for many purposes throughout history. Some specific sorts are used for fibers in the textile and paper industry because of their long stems. It is a useful source of foodstuffs, such as hemp oil and seed. Due to the cannabinoids, cannabis is also a popular recreational drug. These substances can cause mental and physical effects when consumed. The impact of the cannabinoids on the human body is of great interest for the pharmaceutical sector. The research emphasis lies in treating the side effects of chemotherapy, inflammatory diseases like multiple sclerosis or degenerative illnesses such as Parkinson’s disease.[3] AI FAME GmbH, a Swiss company, is a pioneering company to extract the plant-based active substances and make them water-soluble for improved, further processing.

Here, we aim to separate three cannabinoids, i.e. cannabidiol, tetrahydrocannabinol and tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in high purity from the extract.

Experimental

Equipment: PrepChrom C-700

Sample: Water-soluble cannabis extract. Cultivated, extracted and provided by AI FAME GmbH

Preparation: The chromatographic separation is performed with 1 mL of the water-soluble cannabis extract diluted in 1 mL methanol : water (1:1)

Separation: Method parameters
Column:  Sepacore® C-18 80 g
Particle size:  40-63 μm
Flow rate:  40 mL/min
Sample loop:  2 mL
Detection:  253, 270 nm and SCAN 200-600 nm

Gradient: methanol (A) : water(B)
50 % – 90 % methanol (A) in 20 min
90 % – 90 % methanol (A) in 10 min
90 % – 95 % methanol (A) in 5 min
95 % – 95 % methanol (A) in 10 min

Results

Cannabidiol (CBD) bearing a 1,3-diol functional group on its benzene ring, is the first substance to be eluted when applying reversed phase conditions (Figure 1), hence, is the most polar cannabinoid in the sample. The second compound, eluting after 27 minutes, is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The last substance to be eluted is tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), a form of cannabinoid which easily decarboxilates in to THC when exposed to light or heat. Assignment of the signals and identification was done by comparison with reference HPLC data provided by AI FAME GmbH.

Cannabinoide SN finalFigure 1: Methanol : water separation of the extracted cannabinoids using the PrepChrom C-700. Detection at 270 nm, 254 nm, and 200-600 nm SCAN.

 

 

Conclusion

The three cannabinoids extracted by AI FAME GmbH could easily be separated and separately collected with the PrepChrom C-700.

The water-solubility of the extract enables the use of aqueous solvents that have inherent economic and ecologic advantages over common organic solvents.

The growing interest in the clinical use of cannabinoids is unbreakable. Furthermore, cannabis is decriminalized and it is allowed to exploit the potential of its valuable substances. BUCHI offers straight forward solutions to separate and purify small to large size batches of the precious extracts.

Acknowledgment

AI FAME GmbH, Switzerland, is thanked for providing the extract and for the fruitful analytical discussion.

References

[1] Sutton, IR. Daeniken, P. (2006). Cannabinoids in the management of intractable chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and cancer-related pain. The Journal of Supportive Oncology.

[2] State Medical Marijuana Laws. National Conference of State Legislatures. (16.3.2015). http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/state-medical-marijuana-laws.aspx

[3] Kogan, NM. Mechoulam, R. (2007) Cannabinoids in health and disease. Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2007 Dec; 9(4): 413–430.

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